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Nutritionist picks: The best of Subway’s menu

Subway may not be as healthy as you think. Researchers from the University of California Los Angeles found that despite claims to the contrary, Subway is just as unhealthy as the oft-reviled golden arches of McDonald’s which was surpassed in 2011 by the sandwich chain for most stores in America. So make sure you stick with the good choices on the menu.

    Key Takeaways:

  • The same rule applies to breakfast:. If you want the egg whites and cheese from an egg and cheese breakfast sandwich to sit on top of a bed of leafy greens, all you have to do is ask your sandwich artist.
  • Most of our sandwich picks come from Subway’s Fresh Fit menu, which includes sandwiches that are low in saturated fat, are sensible in calories and have less sodium than some of the other sandwiches.
  • When it comes to breads, the chain’s nine-grain wheat bread and multigrain flatbread are richest in whole grains and fiber.

“The same rule applies to breakfast:. If you want the egg whites and cheese from an egg and cheese breakfast sandwich to sit on top of a bed of leafy greens, all you have to do is ask your sandwich artist.”

http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/03/health/subway-menu-nutritionist-food-drayer/index.html

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Innovative procedure to measure cell energy production developed

Software tools have been developed to help researcher’s analysis the generation of energy in human immunity cells. The goal behind the software tool is to allow for the measurement of energy by human cells to track if drugs or dietary intake can cause improvement or worsening of disease development within humans.

    Key Takeaways:

  • This procedure can accurately compare peripheral blood cells from healthy people to those with diabetes.
  • Development of this automated tool increases the researchers’ capacity to analyze the large number of cell samples required for rigor in human materials research.
  • According to the researchers, this tool will allow them to determine whether dietary intake and drugs would help normalize the chronic inflammation that is known to drive disease development.

“Measuring energy production is critical for determining how immune cells fuel inflammation in many diseases such as obesity and diabetes.”

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170208150137.htm

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Weird Diabetes Dreams

People with diabetes sometimes have weird dreams. The author of this article, Mike Hoskins, has diabetes and has weird dreams. In one of his dreams he ate a salad with spinach in it. A little piece of spinach got stuck in his front tooth. He couldn’t get the spinach to budge. He used his toothbrush and still couldn’t get it. He finally got it out with his finger. When he removed it it was no longer spinach. It was a blood test strip.

    Key Takeaways:

  • Instead, it stayed securely where it was. I used my toothbrush to target that spot specifically, and the spinach instinctively acted like a turtle and hid itself further into my gum. Almost disappearing.
  • No memory remains of what the entirety of the dream was about, or how I ended up in the particular moment that I did.
  • But the brunt of what I’m writing about involved me standing in front of a bathroom mirror, probably in the evening post-dinner hours. Apparently, I had eaten a salad with spinach in it with my dinner.

“But the brunt of what I’m writing about involved me standing in front of a bathroom mirror, probably in the evening post-dinner hours.”

http://www.thediabeticscornerbooth.com/2017/01/weird-diabetes-dreams.html

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Diabetes in Chinese adults linked to 9 years’ loss of life

There is some information of those who suffer diabetes and it is that it can shorten life expectancy. Among adults in China, those with diabetes diagnosed in middle age lose, on average, nine years of life compared with those without diabetes, according to new research. These findings can be expanded to all groups of people.

    Key Takeaways:

  • Most previous studies of diabetes have been in high-income countries where individuals with diabetes are generally well managed.
  • Diabetes was associated with increased mortality from ischemic heart disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, infection, and cancer of the liver, pancreas and female breast.
  • The researchers found that, compared with adults without diabetes, individuals with diabetes had twice the risk of dying during the follow-up period, and the increase was higher in rural areas than in urban areas.

“Diabetes was associated with increased mortality from ischemic heart disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, infection, and cancer of the liver, pancreas and female breast.”

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170117140126.htm

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A new index for the diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is very prevalent worldwide, especially so in industrialized nations. Catching it early can help prevent more serious diseases of the liver as well as many other dangerous health conditions. Many of the advanced technologies available to help accurately diagnose fatty liver disease early are not cost effective. Researchers have developed a new index to help aid in early diagnosis.

    Key Takeaways:

  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become a global epidemic. There is not only a great interest worldwide to understand the causes and consequences of fatty liver disease, but also to diagnose fatty liver disease at an early stage.
  • Approximately every third adult in the industrialized countries has a morbidly fatty liver.
  • For these people, this not only increases the risk of advanced liver diseases such as liver cirrhosis and liver cancer, but also, in particular type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

“Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become a global epidemic.”

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170123125534.htm

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‘FishTaco’ sorts out who is doing what in your microbiome

Your gut plays an important role is showing your level of health. A growing body of evidence indicates that the trillions of microbes that live on and inside our bodies affect our health. Collectively, these resident microbes from our microbiome. This could become a key to making sure a persons stays healthy.

    Key Takeaways:

  • Growing evidence suggests that the trillions of microbes that live on and inside our bodies affect our health.
  • A new computational method, dubbed FishTaco, seeks to understand how these different bacterial species contribute to disease-associated imbalances.
  • Read on to learn more about FishTaco and how it might be able to prevent or treat these conditions more effectively in the future.

“This method allows us to pinpoint which microbial species in our microbiome are responsible for each functional imbalance so they can be targeted for therapy.”

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170119134530.htm

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Type 1 diabetes linked to gut inflammation, bacteria changes

People with type I diabetes have inflammation in their digestive tract and there is bacteria in the gut not found in people without Type I diabetes. Type I diabetes usually occurs in young people when their immune system attacks the pancreas, decreasing Insulin production. The study was performed by retrieving samples using endoscopy techniques. Researchers are exploring wether the bacteria and inflammation is there because of the diabetes or if it is caused by the diabetes. The hope is to use this research to come up with new ways to treat the disease.

    Key Takeaways:

  • Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body produces little to no insulin.
  • “Some researchers have theorized that the gut may contribute to the development of Type 1 diabetes, so it is important to understand how the disease affects the digestive system and microbiome.”
  • Individuals with Type 1 diabetes showed significantly more signs of inflammation of the gut’s mucous membrane linked to 10 specific genes than the participants who had celiac disease and control healthy subjects.

“Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body produces little to no insulin.”

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170119163442.htm

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5 Ways to Reduce Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes – 9NEWS.com

If you have a family history of diabetes or are pre-diabetic your risk for diabetes is high but there may be something you can do about that. Start by cutting the sugar out of your diet. Exercise daily do anything to elevate your hear rate. Get outdoors and consider supplementing vitamin D. Cut the soda, cut the alcohol, but don’t let go of the coffee.

    Key Takeaways:

  • Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Early morning exposure to the sun is one way to get a small dose of this extremely important vitamin.
  • Resistance (strength) training and interval workouts helps the body respond better to insulin and use blood sugar more efficiently
  • Cut the soda, cut the alcohol, but don’t let go of the coffee. Soda and alcohol both can wreak havoc on blood sugar levels. Coffee, on the other hand, has been shown to actually decrease the risk for type 2 diabetes.

“Work out vigorously every day. Do something to elevate your heart rate. Even if you only have 10 minutes a day, get your body moving and lifting weight. Resistance (strength) training and interval workouts helps the body respond better to insulin and use blood sugar more efficiently.”

http://www.9news.com/life/wellness/optimum-wellness/5-ways-to-reduce-your-risk-for-type-2-diabetes/387059216

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MSG in food causes brain damage, obesity and other health risks

There is much controversy surrounding the use of MSG. Even though it is still regarded as safe by the FDA, there are health risks involved. When tested on mice, they were found to have higher risks of obesity, brain lesions, stunted bone growth, and sterilization. The health issues were more serious when MSG was presented earlier in life. The mice that developed obesity from MSG were also at a higher risk of diabetes and insulin resistance. These results also seem to correlate to observed humans who have been known to eat higher amounts of MSG.

MSG in food causes brain damage, obesity and other health risks

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Language Barrier May Keep Some Hispanics From Good Diabetes Care – Arizona Daily Star

Language barrier can make a lot of things in life difficult. It may not be as easy to communicate about issues especially at the doctors. This is why many Hispanic patients do not get the treatment they need for diabetes. This is because it can not be fully explained to them, which includes treatments.

    Key Takeaways:

  • The study found that more than 60 percent of Spanish-speaking Hispanic patients did not take newly prescribed diabetes drugs as directed.
  • That’s compared to about 52 percent of English-speaking Hispanics, and 37.5 percent of white patients, the researchers said.
  • Our study among insured patients suggests that more needs to be done to improve adherence to newly prescribed medications among Latino patients at all levels of English proficiency.

“more than 60 percent of Spanish-speaking Hispanic patients did not take newly prescribed diabetes drugs as directed. That’s compared to about 52 percent of English-speaking Hispanics, and 37.5 percent of white patients”

http://tucson.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/language-barrier-may-keep-some-hispanics-from-good-diabetes-care/article_2372f2d8-7ced-5750-b051-8d5c77e20da3.html